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When I visited the Adelaide Casino this time around I didn’t come with the intention of having a flutter but rather with the sole desire to see the Marble Hall, the first room (and main table gaming area) you encounter when you enter the Casino via its main entrance on Station Road.

Attired in shorts and a t-shirt (albeit with a collar) and having that aroma one does having walked the streets of Adelaide on a fairly hot day sightseeing for nearly six hours, I anticipated being denied entry. Having been assured by the doorman that my attire was indeed suitable I then ventured to tell him my true intent of entering, namely to have a look at and take a few photos of the Marble Hall. This I assumed would lead to my immediate ejection (as I was now in the small lobby). Pleased that I wished to admire the building and having come across as knowing something about it, he indicated that I could (having his permission) take pictures, but only of the ceiling and under no circumstances was I to lower the camera to a level that I might take pictures of the tables or clientele.

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Having assured you that my photographs above are above board, I need to tell you (and this you will already know if you have read my review on the Adelaide Railway Station) that the Casino is in, and indeed takes-up the major part of the beautiful 1928 neo-classical Railway Station building and has done so since the late 1980s.

The Marble Hall (which is in fact not built of marble) was the former grand domed waiting room of the Railway Station where interstate travellers would while away an hour or two in the days when travel by train was elegant, luxurious and fashionable, though expensive, in all but the lower classes. To be fair to what remains of Australia’s interstate rail service, it remains elegant, luxurious and fashionable, though expensive – and a great way to travel if you have the time and the money.

For film buffs, the ballroom scene in Gallipoli was filmed in the Marble Hall.

Had I been able to lower my camera, having taking picture 1, I would have been able to take a picture of the Casino’s grand new Chandelier, a 7.2m circumference, handcrafted (in Italy) specimen with over 2000 crystals. You wont miss it if you visit. The picture below is from a Casino promotional publication.

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The Casino itself offers all the games you would expect including blackjack, roulette, pontoon, baccarat and three-card poker in addition to the banks of money eating gaming machines (1000).

While I have not sampled any of them, the Casino is also home to a number of restaurants and bars. It offers valet parking and I am sure there must be a high rollers room tucked away somewhere.

Overall a stylish and glamorous place, certainly relative to Australia’s other casinos most of which I find rather tacky, so if you are going to loose your money, at least do it in style in the Adelaide Casino.

Opening Hours

24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Closed Christmas Day and Good Friday.
First floor, inclusive of poker, is open from 11am – 4am, seven days a week.
Note that various outlets keep varying hours.

Address: Station Road
Directions: In the Adelaide Railway Station Building, off North Terrace
Website: https://www.adelaidecasino.com.au/


For my next Adelaide – NORTH TERRACE review click HERE.
For other Adelaide reviews click HERE.


 

 

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