The Cooma Cenotaph and Corey Memorial Plaque and Diorama

The Cenotaph, a grey granite obelisk, was unveiled on ANZAC day in 1926 to commemorate soldiers from the town and district lost in World War I. Due to a cost overrun, the memorial cost £1,050, there was insufficient funds remaining in the kitty to have the names of the missing soldiers inscribed on the obelisk. Almost half of the £1,050 was contributed by spectators at the Memorial’s opening. Continue reading “The Cooma Cenotaph and Corey Memorial Plaque and Diorama”

Advertisements

The Australian War Memorial At Night

As part of the its activity to commemorate the centenary of the 11 November 1918 Armistice, which brought about the end of World War I, the Australian War Memorial opened its commemorative area for night-time viewing (up to 10pm) on a number of weekends running up 11 November 2018. This rare event allowed visitors to see the memorial in a different light. Again, as part of its commemorative programme visitors were also able to enjoy the Memorial’s temporary 62,000 Poppy Display by night. Continue reading “The Australian War Memorial At Night”

62,000 Poppies Display

In the run up to and as part of its commemorative activities to mark the 100th anniversary of the ending of World War I on 11 November 1918 the Australian War Memorial commissioned a rather haunting and melancholy display of poppies, bathing the western gardens of the Memorial in a sea of red. A moving musical program, created by Chris Latham, the Memorial’s recently appointed musical artist in residence, beautifully complemented the display. The idea of having a musical artist in residence really appeals to me and Chris has got of to a flying start with this project! Continue reading “62,000 Poppies Display”

Edith Cavell – A ‘Glorious Specimen Of Womanhood’

52I have passed by this memorial, just off the northeast corner of Trafalgar Square and across the road from the National Portrait Gallery, many times without even noticing it much less pausing to see that it is in memory of Edith Louisa Cavell, a British civilian nurse in World War I, who was executed by a German firing squad for helping Allied soldiers escape from German-occupied Belgium. Continue reading “Edith Cavell – A ‘Glorious Specimen Of Womanhood’”

Semaphore – War Memorial

I really like this impressive granite war memorial, located between the beach and the small town centre (main street), which also serves as a useful timepiece with a clock on each face of the memorial. It doesn’t really matter that the time on each clock differs by a few minutes – you’re here for leisure purposes. From a memorial perspective the clock reminds us that times passes by for all of us. On top of the memorial is a white marble Angel of Peace (the Semaphore Angel) or is it Winged Victory, with wings outspread and symbolical palm in hand? Continue reading “Semaphore – War Memorial”

ANZAC Park War Memorial

98

I have written separate reviews on Gundagai’s Boer War Memorial, located in front of the town’s ornate court house, and the WWI Memorial at Rusconi Place near the former railway station. Typically, and especially so in smaller country towns, World War I memorials have been expanded to also commemorate sacrifices in WWII and later wars and conflicts. Indeed this occurred in Gundagai but in 1958 a new memorial park, with a grouping of memorials to various wars and conflicts was built in what is now known as ANZAC Park, which also includes a football stadium and various other recreational facilities. This is now Gundagai’s main war memorial. Continue reading “ANZAC Park War Memorial”