Edith Cavell – A ‘Glorious Specimen Of Womanhood’

52I have passed by this memorial, just off the northeast corner of Trafalgar Square and across the road from the National Portrait Gallery, many times without even noticing it much less pausing to see that it is in memory of Edith Louisa Cavell, a British civilian nurse in World War I, who was executed by a German firing squad for helping Allied soldiers escape from German-occupied Belgium. Continue reading “Edith Cavell – A ‘Glorious Specimen Of Womanhood’”


Semaphore – War Memorial

I really like this impressive granite war memorial, located between the beach and the small town centre (main street), which also serves as a useful timepiece with a clock on each face of the memorial. It doesn’t really matter that the time on each clock differs by a few minutes – you’re here for leisure purposes. From a memorial perspective the clock reminds us that times passes by for all of us. On top of the memorial is a white marble Angel of Peace (the Semaphore Angel) or is it Winged Victory, with wings outspread and symbolical palm in hand? Continue reading “Semaphore – War Memorial”

ANZAC Park War Memorial


I have written separate reviews on Gundagai’s Boer War Memorial, located in front of the town’s ornate court house, and the WWI Memorial at Rusconi Place near the former railway station. Typically, and especially so in smaller country towns, World War I memorials have been expanded to also commemorate sacrifices in WWII and later wars and conflicts. Indeed this occurred in Gundagai but in 1958 a new memorial park, with a grouping of memorials to various wars and conflicts was built in what is now known as ANZAC Park, which also includes a football stadium and various other recreational facilities. This is now Gundagai’s main war memorial. Continue reading “ANZAC Park War Memorial”

National War Memorial – Lest We Forget


The National War Memorial has a prime corner sight at the intersection of North Terrace and Kintore Avenue and was opened in 1931 to commemorate those South Australians who gave their lives in World War I between 1914 and 1918. Why it is called the “National” War Memorial is not clear as it only commemorates South Australians lost during the War – perhaps initial intentions differed. Continue reading “National War Memorial – Lest We Forget”