The Guildhall

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This very beautiful neo-gothic red sandstone building, renovations of which precluded my entry in 2013, is the City Hall and seat of the Derry City Council. It is very much worth a look. Continue reading “The Guildhall”

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The Apprentice Boys – Memorial Hall and Museum

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In Northern Ireland there currently exist three Protestant Orders having their roots in the Glorious Revolution of 1688-1690 when the Protestant King William III defeated the deposed Catholic James II and secured his and the Protestant ascendancy to the British Throne. While things moved on in Britain, Irish Protestants immediately started celebrating this victory and have been celebrating it ever since. Continue reading “The Apprentice Boys – Memorial Hall and Museum”

Bishop’s Gate – No Surrender to James II

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This gate is the best known of the four original gates in Derry City Walls and is at the highest point thereof. It was Bishop’s Gate that James II approached on 18 April 1689 expecting the citizens to surrender. James, requested the inhabitants to surrender four times that day. On the fourth occasion James beat a hasty retreat when a cannon was fired from the ramparts killing one of his officers. Thus began the 105 days Siege of Derry. Continue reading “Bishop’s Gate – No Surrender to James II”

Necerne Castle – What’s on the Slab?

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Necerne Castle is one of many Plantation Castles in Country Fermanagh – that is a castle built or acquired by English or Scottish settlers in the early 1600s. What differentiates this from many of the others including Tully, Monea, Crevenish and Portora is its two storey Tudor-Gothic south wing extension added in 1833, its relatively better state of repair (it was used until the late 1940s) and the striking blue wooden panels securing its windows and doors! Continue reading “Necerne Castle – What’s on the Slab?”