Edith Cavell – A ‘Glorious Specimen Of Womanhood’

52I have passed by this memorial, just off the northeast corner of Trafalgar Square and across the road from the National Portrait Gallery, many times without even noticing it much less pausing to see that it is in memory of Edith Louisa Cavell, a British civilian nurse in World War I, who was executed by a German firing squad for helping Allied soldiers escape from German-occupied Belgium. Continue reading “Edith Cavell – A ‘Glorious Specimen Of Womanhood’”

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Not Really a Boer War Memorial

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While classified as a Boer War Memorial by the tourist authorities this is not actually a memorial. Rather it is a plaque on the wharf adjacent to the Port Adelaide Lighthouse, maarking the point from which the first contingent of South Australian Infantry boarded the PS Yatala, for subsequent transfer to the troopship Medic, as they set out for South Africa on 31 October 1899. The plaque was placed here in 1999 to commemorate the commencement of the Boer War one hundred years earlier in 1899. Continue reading “Not Really a Boer War Memorial”

Semaphore – War Memorial

I really like this impressive granite war memorial, located between the beach and the small town centre (main street), which also serves as a useful timepiece with a clock on each face of the memorial. It doesn’t really matter that the time on each clock differs by a few minutes – you’re here for leisure purposes. From a memorial perspective the clock reminds us that times passes by for all of us. On top of the memorial is a white marble Angel of Peace (the Semaphore Angel) or is it Winged Victory, with wings outspread and symbolical palm in hand? Continue reading “Semaphore – War Memorial”

ANZAC Park War Memorial

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I have written separate reviews on Gundagai’s Boer War Memorial, located in front of the town’s ornate court house, and the WWI Memorial at Rusconi Place near the former railway station. Typically, and especially so in smaller country towns, World War I memorials have been expanded to also commemorate sacrifices in WWII and later wars and conflicts. Indeed this occurred in Gundagai but in 1958 a new memorial park, with a grouping of memorials to various wars and conflicts was built in what is now known as ANZAC Park, which also includes a football stadium and various other recreational facilities. This is now Gundagai’s main war memorial. Continue reading “ANZAC Park War Memorial”

Boer War Memorial

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The Second Boer War (1899–1902), which ended with the Treaty of Vereeniging and the conversion of the Boer republics into British colonies, involved large numbers of troops from many British possessions right across the world. This was the last great war restricted to Empire participants and ironically Australia’s first war as a nation, following Federation in 1901. Australians made up five per cent of all Commonwealth forces serving in South Africa during the war. This was a major contribution given the size of its population. Continue reading “Boer War Memorial”

Jufuku-in Temple – Burma War Veterans Memorial

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The vast majority of the many temples in Koyasan are square or rectangular in shape, dark coloured (with the notable exception of the Konpon Daito Pagoda in the Danjo Garan) and have some form of courtyard. As such the brightly coloured octagonal Jufuku-in Pagoda Temple (Manihoto) by the side of the town’s main street really stood out as I made my way from Okunoin Cemetery towards the Garan. Continue reading “Jufuku-in Temple – Burma War Veterans Memorial”