Camel’s Hump Walk – Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve

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The Camel’s Hump walk is the longest and overall the hardest (though the Nils Desperandum walk , for instance, has harder sections) of the marked walks within Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve. There are two suggested ways of getting there with one departing from the Visitors Centre (19kms return) and the other leaving from the Mountain Creek car park (11.6kms return). Both walks are classified as hard with a recommended duration of 8hrs and 6hrs respectively. Continue reading “Camel’s Hump Walk – Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve”

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Red Hill Lookout – Why so called?

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Red Hill ridge separates the central Canberra valley from the Woden Valley to the south and affords excellent views of both Canberra and Woden (the city’s first ‘new town’). Most likely named after the red soil in the area (or perhaps the autumn tree colours), the summit is 734 metres high. Like Mount Ainslie and Black Mountain Reserve there are numerous walking/cycling tracks on Red Hill. Continue reading “Red Hill Lookout – Why so called?”

Barrenjoey Lighthouse & Its Luckless Early Keepers

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At the northern end of the Pittwater Peninsula, Barrenjoey Headland commands the entrance to Broken Bay, the Hawkesbury River and The Pittwater. Throughout the 19th century The Pittwater (see my separate review) was an important shipping route giving access to Sydney, used by legitimate traders and smugglers alike. It also provided temporary safe anchorage for passing ships seeking to escape a storm. Safe access to it from the ocean was an imperative. Continue reading “Barrenjoey Lighthouse & Its Luckless Early Keepers”

Bradleys Head and its Naval Connections

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Bradleys Point is the largest intact area of remnant vegetation remaining in the Inner Sydney Harbour area. This is, in no small measure, due to the fact that the point has, since European settlement, until it became a park been in the hands of the military (navy), thus precluding commercial development. At the very end of the 19th century attempts to develop part of the headland as a mining camp came to nought when a public outcry lead to the cancellation of a mining lease which would have permitted the extraction of a coal seam under the harbour in this area. Continue reading “Bradleys Head and its Naval Connections”