CC Kingston – Patriot and Statesman

19This rather pompous looking statue is of Charles Cameron Kingston somewhat detracts from his achievements and lifestyle which were anything other than highbrow or pompous in nature.

I must say that on first seeing this statue I had not heard of Kingston and wasn’t going to bother writing a review. I make a point of not writing reviews on statues unless the subject is well known (to me at least!) or unless there is an interesting story to tell. With Kingston, having now read up on him, it is the latter. Do let me tell you about this interesting man. Continue reading “CC Kingston – Patriot and Statesman”

Advertisements

Robert Burns – For Auld Lang Syne

1

After a number of years fundraising and having (after seven years of asking) secured land from the Federal Government the Canberra Scots set about building a statue to the memory of the famous Scottish poet, Robert Burns. No sooner had work on the statue commenced in 1935 then a bill for £4 10s, being the first annual land rent, arrived from the Government. This affront was not going to be taken lightly and the quick thinking and “generous” Scots promptly dispatched a honeyed note (or was it a poisoned chalice?) to the Government offering the statue to the people of Australia. The Government couldn’t refuse and on accepting it accepted that it had to pay land rent to itself. The canny Scots had their Burns statue and the government had been outfoxed. Continue reading “Robert Burns – For Auld Lang Syne”

Ethos Statue Worth A Look – Forget the Assembly

35

As far as I can work out from its website, outside the rare ‘Open Day’ the Australian Capital Territory’s (ACT) Legislative Assembly (local government – see footnote below) building is only open to school groups.

Dear Reader, let that not unduly concern you as, I my humble opinion, the building is downright ugly and jaded, entirely befitting its cohort of Honourable Members. Continue reading “Ethos Statue Worth A Look – Forget the Assembly”

Captain Matthew Flinders

59Captain James Cook is most often credited as being the person who discovered Australia, in 1770. In actual fact, Cook claimed the eastern part of the continent for Britain in that year and it was Dutch man, Willem Janszoon, who first landed on the continent on the Cape York Peninsula (in Queensland) and met with Aboriginal people in 1606. It wasn’t until 1803, almost 200 years after this initial European discovery, that someone proved that Australia was an island continent. Continue reading “Captain Matthew Flinders”

Prince Michael Barclay de Tolly

141I came across this rather grand bronze statue when making my way back to the Old City from the must visit Corner House (former KGB Building).

Prince Michael Barclay de Tolly (1761-1818) was a Russian Field Marshal (in command of the 1st Army of the West, the largest of the Russian armies facing Napoleon) and Minister of War during Napoleon’s invasion of Russia in 1812 and during later campaigns of the Russian army in Europe. Continue reading “Prince Michael Barclay de Tolly”