In Between Two Worlds

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Through a combination of cloud murals/etchings and thirty hanging silver spirit figures artist Jason Wing, of Aboriginal and Chinese descent, made a stunning transformation of the 200 metres long Kimber Lane in Chinatown, in 2013. Lying, as it does, at the rear of and between two blocks of mainly restaurants I had (before the transformation) become accustomed to the sight and smell of mounds of rubbish and food scraps in Kimber Lane as I would hurriedly make my way by of a night. Continue reading “In Between Two Worlds”

‘Youngsters’ in the Street

On the corner of the George and Barrack Streets (across George Street from Martin Place) I came across this bronze, almost life size, sculpture of a young girl in baggy pants and a hoodie. Looking around I could see no plaque or anything else telling me about the sculpture though I did notice a separate, similarly clad, youngster about 10-20 metres away further up Barrack Street at the entrance to the Burberry store which occupies this prime city centre corner site. Continue reading “‘Youngsters’ in the Street”

From Soviet Union to European Union

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In 1991 Latvia shook off the shackles of the Soviet Union, ending 51 years of forced occupation and rule of the country by Nazi Germany (1941-44) and the Soviet Union (1940-41 and 1944 -1991).

In 2003 the people of Latvia (or 73% of them) turned out at polling stations to take part in a referendum on joining the European Union. Opponents of membership argued that Latvia should not give up the sovereignty it had so recently gained from the Soviet Union while supporters, among other arguments, put forward to view that membership would actually protect Latvia from any future Russian pressure. Continue reading “From Soviet Union to European Union”

Janus and the Lusty Man

I have to say I was rather surprised when I visited Caldragh Cemetery on Boa Island, Lower Lough Erne. For many years I have seen just close-up pictures of “Janus” and the “Lusty Man” (properly referred to as the Boa Island and Lustymore figures respectively) and accordingly, or for whatever reason, assumed them to be at least a couple of metres high. On entering the cemetery I could not see the said figures. Wandering around I happened upon them – Janus being about 73cms tall and the Lusty man about 60cm – sitting in the centre of the graveyard among random stones that mark long-forgotten dead. A nearby base – which some think belongs to Janus – would, if that were the case, increase its size to nearly 2 metres. Continue reading “Janus and the Lusty Man”