The Great Dangaroo Flood

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While probing the east end of Old Compton Street in search of evidence of the former Little Compton Street I happened to look up and spy a brass plaque, attached about 4 metres from the ground, on Number 7.

Squinting my eyes somewhat I was able to ascertain that the plaque marked the high water mark in the Great Dangaroo Flood, an event that heretofore I had never heard of. The plaque left me somewhat mesmerised and further investigation ensued. Continue reading “The Great Dangaroo Flood”

Professional Fishermen’s Memorial

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In addition to being a commercial port for the import and export of goods and indeed people, Port Adelaide has had a long history in commercial fishing – an oft dangerous activity for the unprepared in dangerous seas. Continue reading “Professional Fishermen’s Memorial”

Workers Memorial

25Port Adelaide has, since the 1830s when Colonel William Light, the first Surveyor-General of the Colony of South Australia and designer of Adelaide, decided that it and Adelaide should be distinct separate entities, always been a blue collar or working class area. The gentry resided in Adelaide. This division, by and large, remains to this day.

Outside socialist countries one rarely comes across grand or tasteful monuments or memorials to the working classes. It was thus somewhat of a surprise when I came across this memorial and determined that it was to the working man (and indeed woman). Continue reading “Workers Memorial”

The Pioneer Memorial

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As soon as you step of the tram or otherwise arrive in Moseley Square at the end of Jetty Road and look towards the sea the first thing that will capture your attention is this striking 12.9 metre high monument of Kapunda marble with its base of Murray Bridge granite. You also can’t fail to notice the beautiful setting amongst the palm trees. When I first saw the monument I instantly assumed it was a War Memorial. Continue reading “The Pioneer Memorial”

Sea Captains Anchor Memorial

The European history of South Australia owes much to mariners who transported people and property there over the years, right through from the first settlers in the 1830s. One often hears about Australia’s convict history and how many of European extraction have convict roots. Unlike New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania in particular, South Australia was not a convict colony. Continue reading “Sea Captains Anchor Memorial”

A Tribute to a Noble Woman

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To the right (looking out to sea) of the Brighton Arch of Remembrance is this marble drinking fountain (non functioning), a memorial to a Mrs Kitty Primrose Whyte. It was erected in 1926 by the women of Brighton.

Kitty Primrose Whyte (nee Miss Kitty Macully) was the daughter of Reverend Alexander Macully (more on him, a bit of a character, in another review!), the Rector of St Jude’s Church, here in Brighton. Continue reading “A Tribute to a Noble Woman”

Yarri and the Great Flood of 1852

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Located along Sheridan Lane by Morley’s Creek are a number of reminders of the 1852 flood in Gundagai.

Europeans began settling in Gundagai in the 1820s. Ignoring the advice of the local Wiradjuri Aboriginal people, they established and developed the town on the low-lying alluvial flats between the Murrumbidgee River and Morley’s Creek – that large expanse of lowland (floodplain) between the river and today’s town which you can see traversed by the Prince Alfred Bridge and the Old Railway Bridge (picture 5). Continue reading “Yarri and the Great Flood of 1852”