Australian National Korean War Memorial

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A plaque within this memorial, on ANZAC Parade,  provides a brief history of the Korean War and Australia’s involvement there-in. I reproduce that in full here for the interest of readers of this page. Continue reading “Australian National Korean War Memorial”

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The Forgotten War (Korean War)

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The ‘Conflicts 1945 to Today’ galleries at the Australian War Memorial commemorate Australia’s post WWII war and peace-keeping operations. The galleries cover Korea, Malaya and Indonesia, Vietnam, Afghanistan and the two Gulf Wars.

In this review I would like to go into a little more detail on what is often referred to as the ‘Forgotten War” – the Korean War. Continue reading “The Forgotten War (Korean War)”

Pohyon Temple – Mt Myohyang

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Pohyon Buddhist temple, one of the few places of worship in North Korea open to foreign visitors, dates from 1042 and the Koryo dynasty. It was founded by a monk named Kwanghwak and is named after the saint that guards the morals of Buddha. The current incarnation of the temple mainly dates from post the Korean war (1951-53) when the temple complex was extensively damaged by US bombings with over half of the buildings completely destroyed. Continue reading “Pohyon Temple – Mt Myohyang”

Sinchon Museum of American War Atrocities

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Those who have read others of my North Korea entries will be aware of what North Korea thinks of the United States. Since 1866 when the US warship, the General Sherman, was destroyed and all its crew killed after it sailed up the Taedong River seeking to engage in trade with, and land missionaries in, the country against the expressed wishes of the Korean Imperial Court, the United States has been seen as the very devil incarnate. The US continues to be held responsible for everything negative in North Korea. Every opportunity to demean, belittle, humiliate and insult the US is availed of. Continue reading “Sinchon Museum of American War Atrocities”

The Joint Security Area & Meeting Rooms

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When most people think of the Korean Demilitarised Zone the image that most often comes to mind is one of Joint Security Area (JSA), and in particular the three blue and two white buildings therein which straddle the border between North and South Korea (pictured above). The JSA is the only place where visitors from both North and South Korea visit – albeit (with one exception – see below) their respective part of the JSA. Continue reading “The Joint Security Area & Meeting Rooms”

The Axe Murder Incident

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The Axe

With the signing of an Armistice Agreement in 1953 Korean War hostilities came to an end and former combatants commenced negotiations to bring about a peace agreement to formally end the Korean War, a war which gained practically nothing for either side but cost the lives of almost 3 million people.

At the time of my visit in April 2014 these peace negotiations were in their 61st year and peace between the two belligerents seemed no closer than it did when the military truce was called in 1953.
Continue reading “The Axe Murder Incident”

Armistice Agreement Signing Hall – Peace Museum

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After over 2 years of negotiations in the Armistice Talks Hall (see my separate review) and the death of nearly 3 million people the two combatants in the Korean War, North Korea/China and the United Nations Command or UNC (South Korea, the USA and about 10 other “minor” participants –importantly, under command of the US and not the UN) agreed on the terms of an armistice. In simple terms, the agreement to be signed would provide for an end to hostilities (a cease-fire), the creation of a demilitarised zone, the repatriation of prisoners and an agreement to continue peace negotiations. Continue reading “Armistice Agreement Signing Hall – Peace Museum”