Old Kinlough Church and Cemetery and the Civil War

28

Having spent a few hours in Bundoran, albeit, due to inclement weather, a substantial part of it in the bar of the Great Northern Hotel, I decided on a route back to Enniskillen (where I was staying) which I don’t recall having ever taken before, that is via the R281 to Belcoo on the border and, from there, on into Enniskillen.

Having passed through the small village of Kinlough (which takes name from its position at the head of Lough Melvin – the Irish Cionn Locha meaning head of the lake) I spied the ruins of an old building, surrounded by trees, less than 50 metres off to my right so pulled in for a closer look. Continue reading “Old Kinlough Church and Cemetery and the Civil War”

Republican Paramilitary Memorials

97

At various points in the city, if you keep your eyes peeled you will come across plaques, erected by the Derry Republican Graves Association, to Irish Republican Army (IRA) volunteers killed in the Northern Ireland “Troubles” – the term used to describe the 30 years of conflict between 1969 and 2000 which tore the protestant and catholic or unionist and republican communities apart. Continue reading “Republican Paramilitary Memorials”

Bloody Sunday Memorial

72

On what quickly became known as Bloody Sunday ( 30 January 1972) – no doubt echoing Dublin’s Bloody Sunday of November 1920, 13 protesters at a civil rights march were shot dead by troops from the British Army’s Parachute Regiment (1 Para). On 16 June 1972 a further protester died from wounds sustained on Bloody Sunday. This memorial on Rossville Street in the Bogside, where the deaths occurred, is to the 14 dead. Continue reading “Bloody Sunday Memorial”

Enniskillen War Memorial

Enniskillen’s War Memorial at the intersection of Belmore Steet, the Queen Elizabeth Road and East Bridge Street was constructed in the aftermath of World War I to commemorate those who lost their lives in that war.

The Memorial stands about 6.5 metres high and is surmounted by a bronze figure of a lone private soldier in war kit, head bowed and leaning on his reversed rifle. I was particularly taken by the 1932 picture of the War Memorial (picture 2 above) taken by Fr.Francis Browne MC, former Chaplin to the Irish Guards. Continue reading “Enniskillen War Memorial”