Lunch, Revolutionary Dessert and a flight from Orang Airport

Our hearts and minds filled with the revolutionary spirit of Kim Jong-suk, it was time to eat before we started out for the airport to catch our charter flight back to Pyongyang. The Kyongsong Hotel, where we would dine, was only a short drive from the Jipsam Revolutionary Site, which half our group, including me, had just visited. Continue reading “Lunch, Revolutionary Dessert and a flight from Orang Airport”

Advertisements

Jipsam Revolutionary Site

Today we had a choice of two activities for our pre-lunch stop. After lunch we would continue on to Orang airport for our return flight to Pyongyang. Having a choice in North Korea, and in particular one that results in the group being split in two, is rare but was made easier here in the north east of the country as we had additional local guides and we were travelling in two smaller buses.  Our normal large bus was not suited to the roads in this more mountainous part of the country but then again neither was one of our smaller buses though that’s a story for another review. Continue reading “Jipsam Revolutionary Site”

The Irish in Cooma

My regular reader may be aware that I am originally from the Emerald Isle.

It never ceases to amaze me as I travel around the world how the Irish seem to be, or have been, everywhere including some of the most bizarre and remote places on earth. Where isn’t there an Irish pub (granted some of them are not very Irish!)? From Cusco in Peru to Suva in Fiji the Irish are everywhere. I even came across a Northern Irish flag proudly flying on Ascension Island, in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. Continue reading “The Irish in Cooma”

Hoeryong’s Children’s Palace

I suspect it will come as a surprise to many that North Korea has a 100% literacy rate. In North Korea everyone receives twelve years (extended from eleven in 2012) of full time, state funded, education – from kindergarten to high school. After this there is the option to go to university and other institutes of higher learning. Education in North Korea focuses on preparing students for the workforce (including the military) and aims at not only advancing the prospects of each student but also those of the country, consistent with its Juche, or self-reliance, ideology. There is a significant focus on foreign languages, science and technology but this is not at the expense of the arts, culture and sports. Continue reading “Hoeryong’s Children’s Palace”

Mother Kim Jong-suk – Starting a Trend in Cross Border Travel to China?

Our final stop in Hoeryong, specifically related to the memory of Kim Jong-suk, was the banks of the Tumen River which, here, serves as the country’s northern border with China. Having completed our tour of the Kim Jong-suk city sites we boarded our bus for the short trip to the border. Continue reading “Mother Kim Jong-suk – Starting a Trend in Cross Border Travel to China?”