Gundagai from Mount Parnassus and Rotary Lookouts

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For those who like to get an overview of Gundagai there are two lookouts worth the short trip involved in getting there – Mount Parnassus and Rotary. Neither trip need take longer than 20 minutes (unless you want it to). Continue reading “Gundagai from Mount Parnassus and Rotary Lookouts”

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Other Interesting Buildings In Downtown Gundagai

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I have referred to a number of buildings in my other reviews principally because, in addition to them being aesthetically pleasing, they also have a story to tell.

As you walk down the main street there are a number of other buildings worthy, at least, a passing look. A couple, being purveyors of alcoholic beverages are worthy a closer examination if you are feeling thirsty, though they also serve decent food. Continue reading “Other Interesting Buildings In Downtown Gundagai”

ANZAC Park War Memorial

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I have written separate reviews on Gundagai’s Boer War Memorial, located in front of the town’s ornate court house, and the WWI Memorial at Rusconi Place near the former railway station. Typically, and especially so in smaller country towns, World War I memorials have been expanded to also commemorate sacrifices in WWII and later wars and conflicts. Indeed this occurred in Gundagai but in 1958 a new memorial park, with a grouping of memorials to various wars and conflicts was built in what is now known as ANZAC Park, which also includes a football stadium and various other recreational facilities. This is now Gundagai’s main war memorial. Continue reading “ANZAC Park War Memorial”

Yarri and the Great Flood of 1852

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Located along Sheridan Lane by Morley’s Creek are a number of reminders of the 1852 flood in Gundagai.

Europeans began settling in Gundagai in the 1820s. Ignoring the advice of the local Wiradjuri Aboriginal people, they established and developed the town on the low-lying alluvial flats between the Murrumbidgee River and Morley’s Creek – that large expanse of lowland (floodplain) between the river and today’s town which you can see traversed by the Prince Alfred Bridge and the Old Railway Bridge (picture 5). Continue reading “Yarri and the Great Flood of 1852”