Get A Free Bicycle For The Day

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Adelaide City Bikes (Run by Bike SA) is a FREE bike hire scheme available to everyone every day. The scheme is an initiative of Adelaide City Council aimed at achieving a cleaner and greener city.

Bicycles are sturdy machines – certainly not designed for speed but they will get you around the city or along the coast. Bicycles can be ridden anywhere within the city limits – I recommend a ride along the banks of the Torrens River (including to the coast), the Parklands Trail and along the Gulf St Vincent. Continue reading “Get A Free Bicycle For The Day”

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Free Bus Services – 99A/C and 98A/C

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Adelaide Metro Bus Service 99A/C

Route 99A/C (anti-clockwise and clockwise respectively) is a useful free bus service for getting around the centre of Adelaide.

While the area covered can be done on foot the bus service is a very welcome alternative when its wet or Adelaide temperatures sore towards or past 40 degrees centigrade which happens regularly in summer. Continue reading “Free Bus Services – 99A/C and 98A/C”

Travel by Tram

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Adelaide’s tram system consists of one tram line which runs from the Entertainment Centre via the city centre to the seaside town of Glenelg.

While only one line the system is very useful to visitors for three reasons:

(i) the section, within the City, from the Entertainment Centre to South Terrace – eleven stops – is free, hop on hop off as you like. The same applies to the last three stops in Glenelg though this section is less useful to the visitor
(ii) the tram is the easiest and most comfortable way of getting to Glenelg – an important seaside destination and certainly worth half a day of your time
(iii) it can save you a significant amount on parking fees if you are travelling by car and don’t absolutely need to bring it into the city.

In regards to point three – park your car at the Entertainment Centre on Port Road – $4 for all day parking and then jump on the tram for a free ride to the city.

I should point out that the old 1920s tram cars have been replaced by brand new Bombardiar trams (late 2013) so if you read reviews, etc telling you the tram trip to Glenelg is a must do just for the opportunity to ride on an old tram the review is out of date though I have read that there is a plan at some stage to introduce “new, old trams”! See my separate review on the “old, old trams” – the Red Rattler – within my Glenelg category.

The tram is part of Adelaide Metro so the same ticketing system applies. See my separate tip – Bus, Tram, Train – Dayticket for ticket details. Tickets can be purchased on the tram using coins (not notes) or a credit card with pin number. Remember to validate your ticket as appropriate to the ticket.

Trams run every 10 minutes or so on weekdays and every 15mins or so at weekends and on public holidays though less frequently later in the evening.

Since the introduction of new trams and the free service within the city centre area trams have become very popular so be prepared to stand, at least within the city area.

Timetables and other information can be found at http://www.adelaidemetro.com.au/routes/Tram


For my next Adelaide – TRANSPORTATION review click HERE.
For other ADELAIDE reviews click HERE.


Bus, Tram, Train – Tickets and Routes

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A Daytrip Metroticket costs $10.20 and gives you a full day of unlimited travel on buses, trams and trains in the very large Adelaide area. It is valid to 4.30am the following morning. The Daytrip Metroticket is pretty good value if you are going to use public transport outside the free areas(see below). A 3-Day Visitor Pass is also available and costs $26.60. Continue reading “Bus, Tram, Train – Tickets and Routes”

Cycling In Adelaide – General Review

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In terms of off-road cycling, and indeed on road cycling, facilities in Adelaide have always, in my opinion ranked very poorly. I should say that I live in Canberra where we are absolutely spoiled in terms of dedicated off-road cycle paths.

By off-road I mean proper cycle paths (main picture) with reasonable quality, mostly sealed surfaces. I am not referring to mountain biking. Continue reading “Cycling In Adelaide – General Review”

Adelaide For Young And Old

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A criticism often levelled against Adelaide is that it is a city of old people, for old people. When I first starting visiting to Adelaide, many years ago now, I subscribed to this view but as the years have passed I subscribe to it less and less. My more cynical reader might suggest (if he or she were not so kind) that this is due to the fact that I have aged somewhat and now fit nicely into sleepy old Adelaide! Continue reading “Adelaide For Young And Old”

“Lovely….. . You gotta buy them, lovely ladies.”

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Certainly not on the regular tourist circuit, Torrens Island Market is tucked away in the middle of no-where – through an industrial wasteland though only 30mins from Adelaide CBD. Its relative isolation means it is authentic, local and as such the place to go. A word of warning though – there are no stuffed kangaroos, cuddly koalas, gaudy boomerangs or other tacky tourist paraphernalia here (not that readers of blog would be seeking anything tacky!). Continue reading ““Lovely….. . You gotta buy them, lovely ladies.””

Wittunga Botanic Garden – Australia v South Africa

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The South Australian Government manages three botanic gardens in the Adelaide area:

The Adelaide Botanic Garden
Mount Lofty Botanic Garden
Wittunga Botanic Garden.

The 14 hectares Wittunga Botanic Garden was established by Edwin Ashby in 1902 though it did not come into state ownership until 1965. It was opened to the public in 1975 and contains and extensive collection of plants from Australia and South Africa (mainly from the Cape Province district which has similar climatic conditions to Adelaide). Continue reading “Wittunga Botanic Garden – Australia v South Africa”

Waterfall Gully to Mount Lofty Summit Walk

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This challenging, well signposted, walk (8km return) begins in Waterfall Gully at the 1st Falls lookout and continues past the 2nd Falls from where the trail climbs steeply up to the remains of Chinaman’s Hut (1.1kms – picture 2). Archaeologists have been unable to find any sign of past Chinese occupation and the hut was more likely occupied by European woodcutters in around 1900.

Continue reading “Waterfall Gully to Mount Lofty Summit Walk”

Waterfall Gully – Oasis On City Outskirts

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Located in Cleland Conservation Park, Waterfall Gully is home to the largest (18m) of seven waterfalls in the park and is a lovely spot to visit, in itself, from Adelaide (10kms) or as a base for a very popular 4km (each way) walk to Mount Lofty summit (see separate review). Even if not walking the whole way to Mt Lofty summit I recommend you at least go up to the top of the first falls and perhaps as far as the second falls (about 500m). Continue reading “Waterfall Gully – Oasis On City Outskirts”